Blogs

This evening, I found two new Stainforth books located in UVA's Small Special Collections online catalog. Once more, it is Stainforth's bookplates in library provenance metadata that enables us to search for his books and locate his exact copies in online library catalogs. Today's catch includes:
  • Robinson, Mary Darby. The poetical works of the late Mrs. Mary Robinson : including many pieces never before published. In three volumes. London: R. Phillips,1806. [
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Lately, Team Stainforth has been on a winning streak of finding books that we believe were part of Francis John Stainforth's original collection. This is just a fun side project right now, since our main task is to finish transcribing his manuscript catalog. (We have almost completed raw transcription of the 508 acquisitions pages.) After he died in 1866, the auction house Sotheby, Wilkinson...

My Neukom postdoctoral project here at Dartmouth creates a digital model of Francis John Stainforth’s library, which was an actual private library in London collected in the 19th century that contains only books by women who were writing poetry and plays – some of the most popular genres of the day. What makes this library special is that it was the largest library of books by women writers that we have a record of from the 19th century, until the 1893 World’s Fair. Recreating this library as a publicly accessible online resource will offer access to works by five...

The Stainforth Library of Women Writers digital archive project now has a second home on Dartmouth’s new Digital Humanities website and among other DH projects at Dartmouth. Projects that it has the most in common with include The Occom Circle project as well as the Media Ecology Project. See below for project descriptions and links.

The Dartmouth DH website situates the Stainforth project among other DH projects underway at Dartmouth, including (and there are more!)

  • The Bregman Research Studio’s study “
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Yesterday, team Stainforth members at CU Boulder Libraries Special Collections made a video that shows how Stainforth's library catalog manuscript works. The manuscript is a tête-bêche (head-to-toe) volume in which two catalogs share a spine: an inventory of the library's holdings as well as a wish-list or "Wants" catalog of those works the collector knew were in circulation and wanted to acquire. (In the Wants catalog those works that are crossed-off indicate that...
Moody is author of "Anna's Complaint; Or the Miseries of War; written in the Isle of Thanet, 1794" (full text here). Some biographical points of note:
  • Elizabeth (1737-1814) was 17 years older than her husband. They married when she was 40 and he was 23.
  • Her husband was an extremely prolific contributor to the Monthly Review
  • Elizabeth was a regular contributor to the St. James Chronicle. She also wrote at least 29 notices of books for the Monthly Review
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I have recently been thinking about the name of our project, "The Stainforth Library of Women Writers," and the emphasis and authority that the project name places on the collector. Special Collections archives often name a certain collection within their archive after the person who donated it and/or provided funding to acquire more pieces for that collection. In this sense, Stainforth's name should title his collection. In fact, I often abbreviate the title of the project, as a whole, to "the Stainforth project" because part of what intrigues us is the lack of research available on the...
I tailored this guest lecture about the Stainforth Library of Women Writers project for Mél Hogan's graduate course in digital curation (JOUR6871). You will find my slides below. Students came from a variety of departments and, in this course, will build their own archives in Wordpress. One important point I wanted to make was to convey the way that the Stainforth project thinks about the archive in contrast to the way traditional humanist scholarship makes use of archives. I also emphasized a theory of the digital archive as creating versions of and access to textual artifacts...
By tracing Elizabeth Cobbold and her poem "Ode on the Victory of Waterloo" (1815) through each facet of the Stainforth Library project, we learn that Cobbold's work is in conversation with canonical male poets Sir Walter Scott, Lord Byron, Robert Southey (Poet Laureate at the time), and others. To date, her work has not received equal critical attention to theirs. For example, her work is not listed in Romantic Circles' ...
The Stainforth exhibit at MLA appeared in an Inside Higher Ed article today that covered recent Digital Humanities sessions at MLA14, held in Chicago this past weekend. Clearly, I should have tattooed our project URL to my right arm. The article covers the diverse content and popularity of DH sessions at this year's MLA, and it notes that more scholars now understand that the digital tools and practices driving their research are DH practices and are...

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